Good morning. Welcome to third week.

Our first podcast, the Maroon Weekly, is live. The Monday morning production, hosted by Austin Christhilf and Miles Burton, will offer an in-depth look at the most interesting and important campus stories.

  • In the first episode, deputy news editor Alex Ward brings you up to speed on Obama Center developments after a busy week of announcements and filings from the Foundation.

The Sigma Phi Epsilon chapter has disaffiliated from its national organization, rebranding itself the “Epsilon Club.” The fraternity cited “economic reasons” for its decision. While 83 percent of members supported the move, chapter leadership acknowledged that the vote was divisive enough that some members decided to leave on “amicable” terms.

Divinity School Dean Laurie Zoloth floated the idea on November 16 of a Starbucks replacing Grounds of Being, the Divinity School’s beloved basement coffee shop, according to a new timeline of events released by Grounds of Being amid rent negotiations.

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In Viewpoints

Editor Urvi Kumbhat writes in:

Columnist Kathleen Cui argues that there is a gap between the University's professed devotion to community involvement and its actions, especially when it comes to the problem of homelessness.

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The University of Chicago Political Union decided, in the spirit of the nuclear commemoration, that what we need was a debate on whether dropping atomic bombs on civilians in Japan was a good idea.

  • Tomorrow night’s topic: “The US and EU should open their borders to refugees.”

Kwame Raoul, Hyde Park’s state senator who is the son of Haitian immigrants, expressed outrage at President Trump’s recent description of Haiti and several African nations as “shithole countries.” For more local politics news, check out this week’s Citizen Bulletin.

The exhibition team responsible for the Obama library’s museumhosted a community forum, sharing information about their plans:

  • Content will focus on the stories of Barack and Michelle, but there will also be exhibits on black history and progressive movements.

  • The museum plans to share counternarratives and challenges to Obama’s legacy—including racism, nativism, and populism—in addition to his accomplishments.

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In Arts
 

Editor Alexia Bacigalupi writes in: 
 

The Revival’s latest show “Hyde ya kids, Hyde ya Park” mixed humor and local politics.

A panel on “Art, Activism, and the Movement for Black Lives” brought together Syrus Marcus Ware and Precious Brady Davis todiscuss the role of art in bringing about social change.

I, Tonya’s deft portrayal of the complexity of abuse is not a “comic spin on this pathetic, dispiriting story,” writes reviewer Rachel Salisbury, contrary to what The New York Times might think.

Enjoy study breaks with MURAL magazine, Sliced Bread, and the Smart Museum this week, as well as performances by jazz vocalist René Marie and the Boston Camera. More information in Exhibit A, our arts calendar.

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MLK celebration tonight: Three members of the University community will be recognized at the annual MLK celebration this evening. Journalist and activist Dorothy Butler Gilliam will give the keynote speech.

Law School’s exoneration project gets murder charges dropped: Prosecutors dropped charges last week against Thomas Sierra, who spent 22 years in prison, following legal efforts by the University’s Exoneration Project.

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In Sports

Editor Cavell Means writes in:

Men's and women's basketball both take W's over Brandeis.Track and field sweeps the Phoenix Invitational, while wrestlingtakes 7th at their competition. Swimming has its wins and losses at their meet.

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Handsome fish gets musical tribute: This Thursday’s noon carillon recital in Rockefeller Chapel is dedicated to Timmy McFishfish-Bailey, a silver dollar fish who was part of the UChicago Web Services department for almost 18 years.

  • One Facebook commenter expressed her sorrow, saying “Oh my. RIP Timmy Mc. Fishfish Bailey. He was a handsome fish.

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