ARTS

Polygon

"Clone Wars": The Siege of Mandalore Is Our Binary Sunset

By Alina Kim

In the second of two "Star Wars: The Clone Wars" reviews, we witness the chilling end of the Siege of Mandalore arc and say our goodbyes to the Skywalker Saga.

June 2, 2020

Statement from the Editors

By Arts editors

The Arts Editors reaffirm their mission amid the events of the past weekend.

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June 3, 2020

Rolling Stone

The 1975’s "Notes on a Conditional Form": A Remarkably Timely New Album

By Emilie Blum

The 1975’s long-awaited new album examines the intricacies of human existence in many musical genres.

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June 2, 2020

Lex Merico

Noah Cyrus Breaks Free in "The End of Everything"

By Cynthia Huang

The 1975’s new album, "Notes on a Conditional Form," is ambitious in both magnitude and scope; the band succeeds in delivering their truest record yet.

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June 1, 2020

Interscope

Notes on the 1975's "Notes"

By Isabella Cisneros

The 1975’s new album, "Notes on a Conditional Form," is ambitious in both magnitude and scope; the band succeeds in delivering their truest record yet.

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June 1, 2020

HBO

Master of Momentum: Ramin Djawadi’s "Westworld: Season 3"

By Brinda Rao

Djawadi strikes yet again in the soundtrack for "Westworld: Season 3" with an otherworldly, subversive offering.

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May 28, 2020

Nickelodeon

"That’s Rough, Buddy": A Love Letter to "Avatar: The Last Airbender"

By Veronica Chang

When the world needed him most, he vanished—fifteen years after it began airing, "Avatar: The Last Airbender" finally returns on Netflix U.S.

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May 25, 2020

Doren Sorell

Lenny Bruce: Comedy and Censorship

By Isabella Cisneros

At times losing its footing, Ronnie Marmo’s one-man show "I’m Not A Comedian…I’m Lenny Bruce" delves into the life of Lenny Bruce, and his fight against censorship.

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May 25, 2020

Zara Bamford

Zara Bamford: What the Military Doesn’t Want You to Know About Video Games

By Timothy Lee

The Maroon sits down with fourth-year Zara Bamford to discuss her thesis, which argues that the U.S. military utilizes violent video games to recruit future soldiers and desensitize them to the horrors of warfare.

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May 25, 2020

Interview Magazine

"Petals for Armor": Finding Strength in Vulnerability

By Isabella Cisneros

Hayley Williams’s first solo album is a guide to healing and self-love, equally profound and enjoyable.

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May 23, 2020

IGN

Oh, My Dear Clone Wars. How I’ve Missed You!

By Alina Kim

In the first of two "Star Wars: The Clone Wars" reviews, we take a closer look into the reintroduction of the animated galaxy far, far away and its half-brilliant, half-disappointing buildup to the Siege of Mandalore.

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May 21, 2020

Jennifer Clasen/Showtime

Yo, That’s Gay…and That’s the Point

By Kayla Martinez

Watching "The L Word: Generation Q" hasn’t changed my life; but it’s reminded me there are spaces where my friends and I can belong—spaces where we can feel safe being seen.

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May 18, 2020

Elliot Kahn

MAAD Man Set to Graduate in June Tells All

By Julia Holzman

Elliot Kahn sits down with The Maroon to discuss his time with the MAAD minor, the MADD Center, and the mad world of video games.

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May 18, 2020

Ariel Salmon

Ariel Salmon: Reflections on the Rise of Digital Media

By Alina Kim

Ariel Salmon sits down with The Maroon to discuss the process of the finalization of her thesis on Black conservatism, and how Snell manages to keep their house culture alive amid quarantine.

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May 18, 2020

Claire Schultz

A Parting Ode to University Theater

By Claire Schultz

For arts reporter Claire Schultz, University Theater is the perfect middle to a journey through UChicago that offered her a vague exposition and resolution.

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May 18, 2020

Purple Corporation

Purple Corporation's Psychedelectric EP: A Relief in Uncertain Times

By Connor Tree

Purple Corporation’s debut EP is a tribute to their psychedelic rock roots, with an added undertone of electronica, or as they describe it, “psychedelectric.”

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May 11, 2020

Netflix

"Never Have I Ever" Gets Representation Right

By Manya Bharadwaj

Netflix and Mindy Kaling’s new sitcom "Never Have I Ever" brings some much needed representation of the Indian-American experience into the world of American television.

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May 11, 2020

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